#BookReview Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

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That void good books leave behind..
I finished this book last night and just absolutely loved it! Although it was relatively long, almost 600 pages, it wasn’t easy to put down at all.
It’s the first fictional book I read for african authors, and they definitely have a wealth of writing.
Chimamanda’s book Americanah  is a about a Nigerian girl who grew up in Nigeria and makes the move to the US to continue her study there after all the issues happening in Nigeria. She spends almost 15 years there before she decides to move back to Nigeria. Read the rest of this entry »

The 10 Major Life Changes That Helped Me Conquer My Migraines – Part 2

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As I shared with you yesterday the first 5 points of how I conquered my migraines, here are the last 5 points in my journey. Hope what I learned along the way helps you and your loved ones in their journey with migraine.

  1. I learned to love and commit to drinking water, loads and loads of it. I must drink 2 liters of water a day. A full glass (which is half a 500 ml bottle) when I first wake up, another full glass before I sleep. And spread the rest across the day evenly. A glass before and after shower (I read that somewhere, due to dehydration or so). Drinking a cup of coffee or tea must be followed with a glass of water cause caffeine dries your brain.
  2. Read the rest of this entry »

The 10 Major Life Changes That Helped Me Conquer My Migraines – Part 1

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migraine_

I started suffering from migraines around the age of 24, having had a history of frequent headaches since I was in school, it actually took me a while to realize that what I was suffering from was no longer just mere headaches. I only realized they developed into migraines when one day a headache grew in intensity so fast, that my regular painkillers wouldn’t fix it, I could barely open my eyes and felt an urge to gauge my eyes out to relieve the pressure, tears were streaming down my face involuntarily, and I was barely able to drive myself to the hospital. After the doctor examined me, he gave me the confirmed diagnosis of migraine, and that’s when my journey started. Read the rest of this entry »

The Glass Ceiling Created by Conventional Gender Stereotypes

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Mostly on my 6th birthday, wearing a princess dress at the arcade and playing car racing.

I’ve been seeing this particular mindset repeated over and over in new commercials, ads, initiatives that are targeting kids, repeating the same mistakes, but I think people genuinely have no idea about the impact those mistakes have on the generations growing up. What are those mistakes? The repetitive conventional gender stereotypes; the boy can be anything and talk his mind and for that be portrayed as smart, the girl being the princess who cares about her beauty and looks, and how silence is golden with girls.

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A Historical Moment In The UAE’s Road to Women Empowerment

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Yesterday we witnessed a monumental moment in the history of the UAE’s journey in empowering women. This moment was when Her Excellency Dr. Amal Al Qubaisi chaired the UAE’s Federal National Council (FNC) as the first appointed woman to ever take this position. It represents a hugely important moment in time for women empowerment in the country, and proves that the UAE walks the talk and practices what it preaches when it comes to women.

H.E. Dr. Amal Al Qubaisi has a history of great achievements backing her appointment. She started working in academia after graduating with a PhD in Architecture from University of Sheffield in year 2000[i]. H.E. has been in a large number of committees and organizations that focused on architectural heritage and preservations. Her most recent positions are General Manager of Abu Dhabi Education Council and Board Member in Abu Dhabi Executive Council[ii].

Her appointment as Chairperson of the FNC will serve as a precedent for having a woman as chair in an Arab parliament. For a person like myself who is always fascinated by case studies and data, this is a great foundation to build case studies on what impacts it would have on an Arab community and society with women leading the parliament. Statistics have been showing that companies led by women (or have more women on their board of management) perform better on equity, return on sales, and return on investments[iii] [iv], which surely means higher productivity in the overall work environment. So in the case of having a woman chair a parliament, how will that be reflected in the decisions that will be made, in the regulations that will be revised, and on the community overall?

The rest of the article is published on Sail Magazine via this link.

What Having A Girl Guides Association Mean for the Generation of Tomorrow (@ShjGirlGuides)

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Article in brief: the author talks about Sharjah’s Girl Guides, and explains the importance of Girl Guides associations to empower women and combat unconscious gender bias in the society.

Picture provided by Sharjah Girl Guides (SGG)
Picture provided by Sharjah Girl Guides (SGG)

I can’t even begin to imagine how different my life would have been if I had been part of a Girl Guides or Scouts as a little girl. Can you imagine your own life with it? A couple of days ago I attended the badge award ceremony of Sharjah’s Girl Guides[1], under the patronage of HH Sheikha Jawaher Bint Mohammed Al Qasimi, Chairperson of UAE Girl Guides Association and patron of Sharjah Girl Guides (SGG), wife of Sheikh Sultan Bin Mohammed Al Qasimi, Supreme Council Member and Ruler of Sharjah. I had to fight back my tears when the Girl Guides’ activities were listed and they walked proudly and confidently on the stage to receive their badges from HH Sheikha Jawaher. I welled up with pride and joy looking at how much they had achieved.

Let me tell you why this is such an important thing in our community. The leaders of the country have a very clear message when it comes to educating and empowering women. Ensuring women’s education is attainable by putting down proper rules and regulations, but the empowering part will always remain a difficult part to enforce. No matter how much the country tries to mandate gender quotas on leadership roles, if women don’t believe in themselves, and if society keeps thinking of them as the “soft gender”, all efforts are in vain.

The rest of the article is published on Sail Magazine via this link.

The Comeback of Iftah Ya Simsim, The Arabic Production of Sesame Street (@iftahshow)

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Article in brief: As the Arabic production of Sesame Street is returning after more than 2 decades of hiatus, the author explores the background of the show in it’s original and Arabic production forms.

Iftah Ya Simsim - Picture provided by Bidaya Media
Iftah Ya Simsim – Picture provided by Bidaya Media

The question isn’t whether you know it’s back or not, the question is: will it have the same impact now as it first did back then? It’s safe to say that the majority of those who are extremely excited about the comeback are either the generation born in the late 70s and 80s, or the generation who are parents to them. We’re talking about the official comeback of Iftah Ya Simsim, the Arabic production of Sesame Street. Before we talk about the comeback, let’s shed some light on the history and background of both the original and the Arabic productions.

Sesame Street, first aired in 1969, it’s an educational-entertainment show that targets preschoolers. Joan Cooney founded the show with a huge part of its success contributed by Jim Henson, who brought in the complete set of Muppets that Sesame Street is famous for. The main purpose of the show is to teach kids: numbers, letters, words, and grow in them the love of learning, developing, and their sense of curiosity all in a fun and entertaining approach. Sesame Street across the years has been used as a vehicle to instill certain values in the kids in fascinating ways, one of the most obvious examples being racial acceptance and equality among the new generation. They included “ethnic” kids in the show at a time civil rights were newly given to the African Americans in the US. The founder, Joan Cooney, told the Newsweek in an interview few years ago, that it is possible the ethnicity inclusion introduced in Sesame Street may have planted the seeds to now have an African American US president.

The rest of the article is published on Sail Magazine via this link.

The Bill Cosby Scandal, and How I Feel About It

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New York Magazine from cover for their 27July - 9 Aug issue
New York Magazine from cover for their 27July – 9 Aug issue

I wanted to not comment on this, but the story is getting bigger and bigger, that I can’t indulge in my denial anymore.

To those who don’t know, there is a case that has been building up against Bill Cosby for quite some time, that he raped women with the aid of a sedative drug since the 80s. Read the rest of this entry »

The Funeral of Youth Ambitions

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instafamous

We’ve all been at this subject over and over again. Social media influencers, or more specifically, popular instagrammers. I’m not referring to all of them, I’m referring to the ones who are popular not for their specialty, not for their craft, but merely for posting selfies and videos of their daily lives and ramblings. Some instagrammers have reached that level by being an expert in something or associated with any kind of creativity: fashion bloggers, artists, musicians, writers; those are very legit in comparison. But those who baffle me are the popular instagrammers who when asked about, no one can answer what are they known for, except with: oh, everyone knows them on instagram. Read the rest of this entry »

The Human Behavior – Excerpt from “We Are Completely Beside Ourselves”

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“Current psychological research suggests that character plays a surprisingly small role in human behavior. Instead we are highly responsive to trivial changes in circumstance. We’re like horses in that, only less gifted.

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